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[personal profile] zyzyly
I accomplished pretty much everything I planned to accomplish today, in spite of a lack of motivation to do much of any of it. I stayed up late listening to music, and anticipated sleeping in this morning, but ended up waking up at 7:30 and getting up, which portended favorably toward the tasks I needed to do.

After I did some chores around the house, I went into work and dug into the last part of the curriculum revision I am working on. It involves obtaining emergency IV access by drilling a catheter into the marrow space of a large bone. I was trained how to do this when I was a Rapid Response Nurse, and did it twice in real life before moving on to teaching. It's pretty amazing. In about 90 seconds or less, you have a stable IV access that you can use for resuscitation.

Since the curriculum is for nursing students, I pretty much stuck with the basics, and tossed in some interesting videos. I finished the revisions, but want to review them before I upload them to our course page, and send them off to the other programs that will use them. It's the first time I have done anything that other programs will use, and I want to make sure it is correct.

I came home for lunch, then walked along the creek for a bit. It was getting pretty hot, and I didn't go far.

creek reflection

After walking, I went to the grocery store where they have one of the coin counting machines. The way the machines work is that you put the coins in and select an option for payment. If you select a cash payment, the service deducts something like 11.5% of the total and gives you a voucher to take to the checker. If you select to receive a gift card, to something like Amazon, or other places, you get it all, but have to spend it at the place you select. You can also opt to have it donated to a charity of your choice, in which case the entire amount goes to charity.

Malida and I talked it over and decided to do a third of each.

I mentioned previously that the can that the coins are in is too heavy to lift. Malida had the idea of putting them in some empty nut containers we had. I filled one this morning and took it in. It is about 1/6 of the total coins in the can.

coin jar

Care to guess what it weighs, and how much it translated into?

After that I went to the hardware store and got some more stuff to fix my leaky irrigation system. I will work on it in the morning when the windshield repair person is replacing my windshield.

long after dark

7/26/17 09:13 pm
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
I usually work reasonably sane if sometimes long hours. But certain things in my work require me to burn the post-midnight oil. Last night/this-post-midnight turned out to be one of those times. I got home past 3 a.m. Today proved to be a busy but less late-night-ish day.

We walked tonight in the park.  A mixed breed dog that looked a little like Beatrice came bouncing up. She hopped about like a pogo stick as she went, leash-less from place to place. She could have been Tigger from Winnie the Pooh.  Her owner and her owner's toddler daughter
walked up. I asked the dog's name. "Susie", her owner said.  We liked Susie.

Breakfast: frosted flakes and skim milk
Lunch: turkey sandwich and baked chips
Dinner: grilled hamburger on half bolillo rolls and salad

mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
unnamed-1


Credit where credit is due:

Donald Trump is such a talented cultural terrorist.

Consider this morning’s tweetage:

After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow...... ....Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military. Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming..... ....victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail. Thank you.

There goes Caitlyn Jenner’s Big Dream of becoming a Marine sergeant!

###

This is a Big Deal because it’s a basic civil rights issue.

Let's say that Pacific Islanders constituted 1% of the U.S. population (I have no idea whether they do or don't; this is just for the sake of argument), and let's say Trump banned all Samoans from joining the armed forces. Today's tweetage would be something comparable in terms of the basic issues involved.

But it’s such a hot button.

I’m convinced the dialogue around transgender bathrooms is what won the election for Trump.

Personally? I think people have a perfect right to do whatever they want to their own bodies and to justify that any way they please. Do I think some people are born into the wrong bodies? No. But that’s because I think constraints like “femininity” and “masculinity” are cultural constructs devised by a patriarchal society that have little or nothing to do with the actual physical experience of being either female or male. If someone wants to claim a gender that has nothing to do with their genes or their genitals, that’s A-Okay with me, though.

Frankly, I don’t care who shares my bathroom. And I don’t understand why the U.S. doesn’t go for the European solution and install unisex public in all new private and public buildings.

I am against expensive public works projects designed to retrofit existing toilets, but that’s only because I think the money would be better spent elsewhere. Like on schools. Or public transportation systems.

Economic resources are limited at the local level.

But transgender bathrooms are a red flag for anyone who’s even just a little bit right of center. So I don’t honestly know how you go about having conversations about transgender bathrooms or about the right of trans individuals to join the military without derailing conversations that have larger implications for the common good.

###

Trump is able to create a reflexive fear and terror in a significant portion of the American population by violating their norms and expectations about the social code. He does this for political gain and profit, to gain credibility with his base.

Hitler was good at that, too.

###

In other news, I met up with BB’s pal Magdala in Kingston yesterday. We walked around Kingston, which is an interesting little city and oh-so-historic: The 17th century graveyard of the Old Dutch Reform Church is filled with the names of local towns and bridges.

Magdala is an interesting woman. She lived in a tiny Moroccan village in the foothills of the Atlas Mountains for three or four years. She married a Moroccan musician, 15 years younger than she is. She fell in love with him because of his voice.

Of course, I was dying to ask, And do you seriously believe that he fell in love with you? Or did he just see you as a meal ticket?

But, I didn’t.

Because, you know, propriety.

Fortunately, the subject came up on its own without my having to bring it up!

The marriage ended, she told me, because she’d had to come back to the States for a couple of months to take care of her dying mother, and when she returned to the tiny village in the foothills of the Atlas Mountains, her husband had become an alcoholic. And violent. Threatening to kill her.

“It seemed like such a change,” she said to me. “But then sometimes I would think: Maybe it’s not a change. Maybe he always felt like that. Maybe he was just using me.

“Well,” I said as diplomatically as I could. “The cultures are certainly very different. And I don’t know how many questions would be asked about an American woman who disappeared in Morocco.”

I remembered thinking that exact thing about Imaan: For about a year there, I really was the closest thing she had to a mother. And yet, there really wasn’t any closeness. I was dispensable. I was not part of her tribe, so in some essential sense, I didn’t matter.

(It’s funny. I never felt that way about Summer – who comes from a culture that’s even more unlike mine. I’m tempted to pontificate about the essential differences between Middle Eastern and Chinese cultures here. But I’ll spare you.)

We started talking about North Africa in general.

“I’ve been to Morocco, Egypt, and Tunisia,” I said. “Libya sounded interesting, but it always scared me.”

“Libya used to be a great place under Gaddafi,” Magdala said. “I sure wouldn’t go near it now.”

“Under Gaddafi?” I asked.

“Sure! Oh, come on. You can’t believe anything the American propaganda machine churns out. The Libyans adored Gaddafi. Everyone in North Africa adored Gaddafi. He wanted to create a United States of Africa. That’s probably why the U.S. put a target on his back.”

“Make Africa great again!” I said. “A populist!”

“Absolutely, a populist,” Magdala said.

And a consummate narcissist!”

“I suppose,” Magdala allowed.

“Like Donald Trump!” I said.

Magdala was taken aback. “Well, I wouldn’t compare Gaddafi to Donald Trump,” she sniffed.

“Loved by his base? Hated by everyone else? Sounds like Donald and Muammar were separated at birth!”

“I suppose there are similarities,” she said grudgingly.

timgad


In other North African news, Samir – my Algerian student - is really, really smart.

He’s a programmer, right?

A programmer who deals with abstractions that are far more complex than computer programs, which are still based on syntax. He’s an electronics programmer, which is pure machine logic, ones and zeroes that follow no syntax save applied mathematics. It’s a kind of crystalline approach to thought, which is light years beyond anything my brain could approach.

But, of course, he knows computer languages.

I had this thought that since he is a programmer, and I’m trying to teach him to read English very, very quickly, that it might be useful for him to define English as a set of objects and instance variables.

“So,” I said. “You are going to be looking at these sentences for three things: Subject, verb, and object. The subject does the action; the verb is the action; the object is the thing the action is done to, okay?

“Everything else is a modifier. Think of all those modifiers as variables and methods inside invisible parentheses, okay?”

I read a sentence: A tradition as old as the civilization itself, Greek pottery can be studied as a chronicle of ancient Greek society.

“Subject: pottery. Verb: study. ‘Study’ is what they call an intransitive verb, so it doesn’t do something to the so much as affect the object. Object: chronicle.”

I peered at Samir intensely. “Get it?”

He nodded thoughtfully. “But what is ‘chronicles’?”

“Stories. History. Old stories.”

He nodded again.

I read another sentence: It was designed to fulfill a functional rather than decorative purpose, so Greek pottery was fundamentally related to everyday life, not separated from it.

“Subject?” I asked.

“Greek pottery.”

Pottery,” I said. “’Greek’ describes the pottery.”

I could see the lights flickering in his brain.

“Verb?”

“Related,” Samir said.

“Very good,” I said. “Object?”

“Life,” he said.

“Excellent! Furthermore, the Greeks’ pottery is an essential source of historical information because so much of it survives today. Subject?”

“Pottery.”

“Verb?”

“Is.”

“Object?”

“Source.”

“Very good!”

“What is ‘furthermore’?”

“Also. In addition to. TOEFL uses reading comprehension examples from academic writing, so the writers are going to use a lot of words that people never use, but you will have to know them. Although vessels may be broken, even these remnants of pottery contribute to contemporary historians’ understanding of ancient Greek culture. Subject?”

“Remnants.”

“Verb?”

“Contribute.”

“Object?”

“Understanding.”

“Excellent!”

“But what is ‘remnants’?”

“Things that are left over. Things that remain.”

“Ah!” he said.

And then he began to tell me about the lost city of Timgad, a Roman city almost perfectly preserved because it lies in the Sahara desert just south of the foot of the Aures Mountains where Batna, the city he grew up in, lies.

Timgad was his playground when he was growing up. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but since it’s in Algeria, nobody goes there. And since there’s no money for public works administration in Algeria, there are no officials to keep curious teenage boys from exploring.

After that, Samir began to tell me about the lost city of Tkout, which is even more obscure than the lost city of Timgad: It exists on no map whatsoever. It’s the ruin of an Amazighe city that flourished well before the birth of Christ, about 100 kilometers outside of Batna. The hovels of the modern prefecture of Tkout – many of them constructed from the stones of the forbidden city – were the birthplace of the Algerian War for Independence.

Two more places I long to go to.

Two more places I will never go to.

###

Nothing happens for a reason.

Everything happens for a reason.

July 25--Udon

7/25/17 10:37 pm
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
The last time I was driving through the little rural town southeast of us that I love, I noticed that there was a new restaurant. A sushi restaurant. It seemed kind of unlikely that someone would open a sushi restaurant in what is primarily a farming town, but I guess there are a lot of non-farmer people living out that way now. Not to say that farmers don't like sushi.

Anyway, we tried it today for lunch. I don't eat sushi, but there is always stuff that I like to eat. I had a bento box with teriyaki beef. Malida had the sushi. It was quite good, and the restaurant was doing a good business.

dragon

I fooled around with the drip irrigation system this afternoon and extended it to the patio so my lime tree would get some water while we are gone. This evening it sprung a bunch of leaks, so I will have to take another look at it tomorrow. I used a section of old tubing, which I think is the problem.

I have a big crack in my windshield. Not sure what happened, but it is now extended about halfway across. I called the insurance company, and they told me they had a place that could fix it for about $400, which was $100 less than my deductible. Their first appointment was next week, in a shop that's about an hour away from me. I called around and found a place with a great reputation in the community, that will come to my house to fix it, this Thursday, for about $150 less. Easy decision.

I have to go in to work for a few hours and finish up my IV curriculum project. I don't really feel like going in, but it has to get done. I have too much else going when I get back from vacation to put it off.

I'm not ready for it to be fall yet.
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
Today I read that the musician Alice Cooper discovered a Warhol painting he owned but forgot in a tube in a storage space, next to some equipment.  I liked the pictures I saw of Alice Cooper with Andy Warhol, with Salvador Dali, and with Colonel Sanders. I also read that the Duchess of Cambridge and her family wear colors coordinated to fit with other countries' color schemes, in an act of incisive national diplomacy.  I read about the Black Lab Cloudbook, a Chromebook alternative that runs Black Lab Linux. I like the idea of a Linux distribution named after the labrador retriever breed.  I watched the newscaster Robin Meade, and tried to guess the origin of her accent. I thought her accent originated from Maryland or Delaware.  I got it quite wrong--she was from Ohio and once won a contest to become Miss Ohio. Once I knew the answer, I wondered how I could have missed the obvious.  I use the desktop style "Platinum" on my computer. I read that the name originated from a style of computer interface for an older MacIntosh computer system.  All I know is when I hit the little square in the bottom left-hand corner of my screen, I get a menu that makes sense. Other styles gave me menus that require more navigation. I hide icons on my systems nowadays, so an efficient start button makes a positive difference.

Soon I will get a shower and put on my business suit. I will put birdseed on the tiny bench that is a memorial to our dog Scout. I will carry my little travel laptop with me to work, so that I can analyze documents during an out-of-office meeting.  Today will be a busy day.
 

July 24--The Rover

7/24/17 10:53 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
Today I drove to the city of Stockton to take advantage of another Ingress farm that was still up. Much of it was along the Stockton waterfront, where I had not been for many years. Stockton had a rough go of it during the economic downturn, and it still shows. Lots of empty buildings in an area that in any other city would be thriving.

The last time I was in that part of Stockton was in the early 1990s to see a baseball game. There is a minor league stadium near the waterfront. I thoroughly enjoyed that game and always meant to go back, but I never did.

I wandered around for a while and played Ingress. I didn't think to take pictures other than one of what is supposed to be a happy rock, but when I look at it now, it seems to be screaming in terror.

unhappy rock

I stopped at a place I know for lunch on the way back, and it was just about perfect. After I got home I did some chores, and in the evening sat in the back yard as the delta breeze kicked in and cooled off the temperatures.

I am in the thick of my Hardy Boys book. The thing I notice most about the older (and longer) versions, are that the descriptions of the boys' lives are richer. The author spends a couple pages describing their preparations for a camping trip, and the excitement that builds as the trip gets closer. I remember why I liked these books as a kid.
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
I forgot to post yesterday, probably because it was just a normal day where we went out walking along the creek, had some noodles, came home and did stuff. I used to think of this type of day as boring, but now I recognize them as oases between the various trials and tribulations that make up a good part of life. Now I savor them. There's always another storm on the horizon.

thing

I spent the afternoon finishing my coursework for my summer session and writing up a summary for my advisor. I reported 52 hours of "billable hours", which she was pleased with. The next semester starts in about 3 1/2 weeks, and I will have to do some stuff between now and then to prepare for it.

Same thing goes for work. I still have a bunch of stuff to do there to before the semester starts. I will go in Wednesday and knock some of it out.

Last night I put together our trip to Oregon for next week. I love planning trips, and thinking about what we will do along the way. We will spend a couple days in Portland, then head down the coast, and return home a week later. I have made trips similar to this many times, and the landscape is like an old friend. I made sure to include Malida's favorite Oregon Coast sushi restaurant into the plan.

sushi guy
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
Rain last night brought today's temperature down a bit. At 6:30 p.m. I left the office. We watched the American Antiques Roadshow episode set in Kansas City.  I liked the toy bank more than my wife did. I donated a smidge of money on Patreon to Starfrosch, a website in Switzerland that provides information about Creative Commons music. We walked Beatrice in the dark at 9 p.m. The fountain in the park shone bright in the night light. We watched Penelope Keith's show about English villages. I was struck by the Aberdeenshire region near the Cairngorms. On the one hand, all that wild space was great. On the other hand, its existence seemed to be a product of concentration of property in a few wealthy hands.

Breakfast: organic frosted flakes and skim milk
Lunch: turkey sandwich, baked chips, vegetable soup
Dinner: pork loin, potatoes and green beans

Making Samples

7/23/17 08:33 pm
gurdonark: (Default)
[personal profile] gurdonark
I walked on the Chisholm Trail before Weight Watchers. I saw a Snowy Egret wading in the shallow water. A Green Heron looked on, as if to warn the Snowy Egret off. I had heard Garrison Keillor do an effective narrative on NPR about the Detroit riots, the issues created by the police, and the aftermath for Detroit of the riots.. He mentioned the Poetry Magazine Podcast. So I listened to two episodes. Sarah Gambito read her two poems titled "Citizenship", which effectively used imagery rather than polemic to discuss new citizens. In the discussion portion, she discussed how her family members voted differently in the elections.  Oliver de la Paz read his poem "Autism Screening...", in which he gave more descriptive answers to questions he received in real life to help him assess if his child had autism. I liked both podcasts. I should listen to more poetry podcasts.

I planned to gain a bit of weight this week, as I was near the bottom end of the 10-pound bracket set for me by my doctor. I meant to gain 2 pounds but gained 3.2 pounds. My "science"  proved inexact.  I walked around the lake at Oak Point Park in Plano after Weight Watchers. I liked that the little signs now say that kayaks and canoes are permitted on the lake.  Maybe someday I will own a kayak.

I went to church. I was pleased that the associate pastor Jessica Wright gave the sermon in the pastor's absence. She proved a fine speaker. She closed with a talk about learning to be less judgmental.  She said that even if one's first thought is autonomously snarky or judge-y, one should strive in one's second thought to see them as humans (her exact words probably invoked God's love more eloquently than this post has done).

After church, I stopped at KFC.  Then I went home.  During the afternoon, I worked on a music project involving a friend in the UK.  I created seven sets of samples using software and various samples I created.  The samples all turned out complex and interesting. I am not sure how useful they will be for my collaborator. But I'm sure he'll have fun.  I did take a break to throw Beatrice's tennis ball.  She fetched it, like her customary good dog self.  I used the software Noiser, Sawcutter and Tunafish.  I like Noiser, because it has an element of random algorithms about its composition process.

I noticed that we were out of mini-dog-bones and dog treats.  This situation was intolerable. So I ran to the Kroger. On the way, I walked in Green Park, a little park near my home. I saw few birds, but got some good pictures of a male House Finch.

Now we are watching Grantchester.

Breakfast: skim milk and frosted flakes
Lunch: grilled chicken, green beans and half a biscuit
Dinner: two roast beef sandwiches on bolillo rolls with provolone cheese





elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
93.5 °F - Feels Like 106 °F

Just spent a half hour outside, and came in dripping. Ugh.

I was picking the grape tomatoes, squash, collards, and some of the popcorn. The popcorn is a mixture of strains, so every cob is a surprise. Some are much like this "glass gem" corn. Regrettably, pollination wasn't ideal, so there are lots of half populated cobs. Still, given everyone's dismissal of growing corn without a fortress around it, i'm delighted.

I ordered a dehydrator, so the large number of squash doesn't intimidate me. And now i kinda wish for exponential tomatoes, but they don't seem to be coming -- unless i want to pick green and let them ripen in the house. Which is very tempting.

Yesterday i spend outside 10 to noon doing a burn. Most of the time i spent running the hose over myself to keep cool while watching the fire. Usually i keep gathering debris, but not yesterday. I did do some weeding in the shade.

--== ∞ ==--

Christine had what seems like an elephant event last night. But maybe it was just life.

Carrie continues to negotiate bed space with the cats. Turning her back to them is the best thing she's learned so far. They know how to stand up to her when she confronts them, but a big dog back?
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
This morning i started reading about bail justice. I was aware Kamala Harris & Rand Paul -- a name pairing that really gets my attention -- had introduced legislation, and was aware of SONG's (Southerners On New Ground) work in May. So when Song sent this call, i went to read up on the bill -- and found even more information about bail justice.

Across the Southeast, we intend to initiate Free From Fear campaigns to end the practice of cash bail. We see bail outs as an ongoing tactic to build a base, to expose the crisis of cash bail and the beast that is the criminal-legal system, to change hearts and minds, to make real and material impacts on the lives of our people, and to build power. We can think of no better way to commemorate the history of Black August than to bail out as many Black women, broadly defined, and Black trans people free across the South as we can.


The "report" generated from my citation tool Zotero, is below, and you can skim the notes or follow the links for more.

Readings )
  • A Labor of Love: Black Mama's Bail Out Action + Reflection

    Type Web Page
    Author ignitekindred
    URL http://southernersonnewground.org/2017/05/a-labor-of-love/
    Date 2017-05-16T14:50:04-04:00
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM
    Abstract [CLICK HERE FOR SPANISH TRANSLATION] 1. Putting our organizing practice into action. At SONG, our organizing practice has long been based in love, longing, and desire across class, race, gender and community. This action allowed us to demonstrate our collective belief in a shared destiny with the dreams, demands and hopes of Black women in all of our varieties at the center. Our collective cup overflowed locally and regionally with gift cards, bouquets, clothes, services offered by local practitioners, prime ...
    Website Title Southerners On New Ground
    Short Title A Labor of Love
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:13 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Defendants Can’t Be Jailed Solely Because of Inability to Post Bail, Judge Says

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Richard A. Oppel Jr
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/17/us/chicago-bail-reform.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-07-17
    Section U.S.
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract An order issued by Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans of Cook County, Ill., highlights a contentious national debate surrounding the ability of defendants to post bail.
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:29 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Chicago (Ill)
    • Prisons and Prisoners

    Notes:

    • In April [2017], for example, a federal judge in Houston ruled that Harris County could not keep those arrested on misdemeanor charges in jail because they could not afford bail. The judge, Lee H. Rosenthal, who was appointed by the first President Bush, found that the system disproportionately affected indigent residents and violated “equal protection rights against wealth-based discrimination.”

      Tags:

      • Bail

    Attachments

  • Getting Rid of Bail Is Only the Start

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Ginia Bellafante
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/01/nyregion/getting-rid-of-bail-is-only-the-start.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-06-01
    Section N.Y. / Region
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract Using conflict resolution and social services to keep low-level offenders out of the courts should be the next wave in criminal justice reform.
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:23:19 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Brooklyn Community Bail Fund
    • Brooklyn (NYC)
    • Brown, David O
    • Law and Legislation
    • Poverty
    • Robberies and Thefts
  • Opinion | Kamala Harris and Rand Paul: To Shrink Jails, Let’s Reform Bail

    Type Newspaper Article
    Author Kamala D. Harris
    Author Rand Paul
    URL https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/20/opinion/kamala-harris-and-rand-paul-lets-reform-bail.html
    Publication The New York Times
    ISSN 0362-4331
    Date 2017-07-20
    Section Opinion
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:23:52 AM
    Library Catalog www.nytimes.com
    Language en-US
    Abstract Low-risk defendants shouldn’t be detained before trial just because they can’t afford it.
    Short Title Opinion | Kamala Harris and Rand Paul
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:23:52 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:46:32 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
    • Browder, Kalief (1993-2015)
    • Discrimination
    • Prisons and Prisoners
  • Pretrial Justice Institute

    Type Web Page
    URL http://www.pretrial.org/
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:27:47 AM
    Abstract The ProblemThe American system of bail is fundamentally incapable of doing the job we expect from it. Those with money—regardless of where they got the money or their danger to the community or victims—can purchase their freedom while poor defendants … Continue reading →
    Website Title Pretrial Justice Institute
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:27:47 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:46:10 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Selling Off Our Freedom: How Insurance Corporations Have Taken Over Our Bail System

    Type Web Page
    URL https://www.aclu.org/report/selling-our-freedom-how-insurance-corporations-have-taken-over-our-bail-system
    Accessed 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM
    Abstract Selling Off Our Freedom: How Insurance Corporations Have Taken Over Our Bail System is a joint report by Color of Change and the American Civil Liberties Union’s Campaign for Smart Justice that documents how the for-profit bail industry fuels mass incarceration and perpetuates racial inequalities.
    Website Title American Civil Liberties Union
    Short Title Selling Off Our Freedom
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:45:16 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail
  • Type Statute
    Name of Act S. 1593: A bill to provide grants to States and Indian tribes to reform their criminal justice system to encourage the replacement of the use of payment of secured money bail as a condition of pretrial release in criminal cases, and for other purposes.
    Short Title Pretrial Integrity and Safety Act
    Date Added 7/23/2017, 8:36:42 AM
    Modified 7/23/2017, 8:37:42 AM

    Tags:

    • Bail

    Notes:

    • From NYT editorial, re Pretrial Integrity and Safety Act


      ...Excessive bail disproportionately harms people from low-income communities and communities of color. The Supreme Court ruled in Bearden v. Georgia in 1983 that the Constitution prohibits “punishing a person for his poverty,” but that’s exactly what this system does. Nine out of 10 defendants who are detained cannot afford to post bail, which can exceed $20,000 even for minor crimes like stealing $105 in clothing....
      ...black and Latino men respectively pay 35 percent and 19 percent higher bail than white men....

      This isn’t just unjust. It also wastes taxpayer dollars. People awaiting trial account for 95 percent of the growth in the jail population from 2000 to 2014, and it costs roughly $38 million every day to imprison these largely nonviolent defendants. That adds up to $14 billion a year.

      Bail is supposed to ensure that the accused appear at trial and don’t commit other offenses in the meantime. But research has shown that low-risk defendants who are detained more than 24 hours and then released are actually less likely to show up in court than those who are detained less than a day.

      ...

      Kentucky and New Jersey, for instance, have shifted from bail toward personalized risk assessments that analyze factors such as criminal history and substance abuse. These are better indicators of whether a defendant is a flight risk or a threat to the public and ought to be held without bail.

      Colorado and West Virginia have improved pretrial services and supervision, such as using telephone reminders so fewer defendants miss court dates and end up detained.

      These nudges work. Over the second half of 2006, automated phone call reminders in Multnomah County in Oregon, resulted in 750 people showing up in court who otherwise may have forgotten their date.

      ...

      The Pretrial Justice Institute, an organization that works to change unfair and unjust pretrial practices, estimates that bail reform could save American taxpayers roughly $78 billion a year. More important, it would help restore Americans’ faith in our justice system.

    Attachments

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The fabulous [profile] lifeinroseland is visiting this weekend. Whirlwind of activities!

Exciting tour of the Poughkeepsie ‘hood!

Strange dinner cobbled together from ingredients found at Ocean State Job Lot.

Sl-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-eep!

Dragonboat fest!

Local Downton Abbey sighting!

Rhinebeck retail! (I bought a $3 pair of scissors at Sharpy’s!)

More sl-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-eep!

Barbecue with L’s drunken boyfriend!

Sl-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-eep!

###

Today’s itinerary:

An intimate meetup with the Biggest Buddha in the Western Hemisphere.

Antiquing in Cold Springs.

Teary farewell!

###

I am dying to see if that pink Dior jacket in perfect shape that I didn’t buy for $50 three years because it was a tad too small is still in that antique store in Cold Springs.

It was still there two years ago although bizarrely, the store had doubled the price – I mean, if something doesn’t sell, aren’t you supposed to discount it?

The jacket was beautiful, and for an entire year, I tortured myself: I will write away to Hong Kong for fabric swatches to find one that will match its precise color – something between Hello Kitty and that frothy color you get when you beat Cool Whip into raspberry jello – and then I’ll find some struggling seamstress who is struggling to make commissary money to send to her sons – all three of whom have been locked away in the Fishkill Correctional Facility on cocaine trafficking charges – and I will pay her $25 bucks to lengthen the sleeves and do something about the shoulders –

But damn! A hundred bucks for something I can’t possibly ever wear? I don’t know.

If it’s still there, it should be up to $200 by now.

###

C is a pretty bright guy, but when he drinks, he turns into a total redneck. And not just any redneck: a redneck with liberal kneejerk biases. Thus, instead of the usual All Muslims are scum! from C, you get, All Republicans are scum!

“And the bastards are trying to shut down Poughkeepsie’s bus system!” C growled.

He had started slurring his words.

One of the big local issues hereabouts is that Dutchess County is finally wresting control of the city of Poughkeepsie’s flailing bus system. Really, the City of Poughkeepsie should not be running anything. The City of Poughkeepsie can barely keep its streets plowed in the winter: I still remember Adventures in Grocery Shopping between the months of December and March when I was living in Poughkeepsie and I did not have a car. They involved hopping from ice floe to ice floe kind of like Eliza fleeing the hounds.

Lois Lane does not have a car and is completely dependent on the public transportation system, so I get weekly updates on just how awful the City of Poughkeepsie’s administration of its bus system is.

Public transportation, in fact, is one of those few areas where economies of scale make perfect sense.

So, it was kind of a ridiculous argument to be having, plus I have a deep sense of C’s underlying tragedy – I can hardly look at him without flashing on the beautiful young artist wife who went mad and the beautiful young artist daughter who went mad: How do you survive tragedies like that without hating yourself, without thinking, It was something I did, I drove them mad?

Nonetheless, I continued having it – fueled, no doubt, by my deep contempt for Joel Tyner whom C kept citing as some kind of an authority. Joel Tyner is the flamingly left-wing county legislator from Rhinebeck, a weasely attention ‘ho of a type that’s very common in Berkeley – I used to date his clones regularly, which no doubt accounts for my deep, irremedial hatred for him. Talking about Joel Tyner in front of me is like waving a red flag in front of a bull.

Anyway, at some point, I realized I had an incredibly well-behaved guest sitting to my left who had not made a peep but who no doubt was bored to tears by this conversation, so I made C shake hands with me – See? We’re still buds! We can still discuss the finer points of cinematography in “The Creature from the Black Lagoon”! – and toddled off to the Patrizia-torium where I watched Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca.

What a ridiculous movie, and how Hitchcock must have suffered when Selznick and the Hayes Code board forced him to tack on that awful ending.

July 22--Veal Puccini

7/22/17 09:31 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
My sister and her husband came over for dinner this evening. She is actually one of my step-sisters, but the one I grew up with, so she feels more like an actual sister. They are somewhat reclusive, so we don't see them very often, but when we do it is always great. I should note that we are also somewhat reclusive.

It was hot, so I wanted to minimize cooking indoors. I grilled a tri-tip and some ears of corn, made some basmati rice. and a chopped salad. This is the same chopped salad I have been experimenting with. I think I have it down now.

I like to put a bit of chopped up dry salami in the salad to give it some flavor. After I made it the last time, I had a dream that I had put the salami in a kitchen drawer instead of the refrigerator drawer where I keep that kind of stuff. When I looked in the drawer today for the salami, it wasn't there. I think I actually put it in a drawer somewhere. I looked but couldn't find it.

Anyway, the dinner was delicious. We spent a couple hours eating and catching up. I always enjoy their company.

I told my sister a story about the time me and my two friends flew down to LA to attend the premier of some Rolling Stones movie. This was right around the time we graduated from high school. There was a side story about magic mushrooms that got the story started, but my favorite memory was having dinner after the movie.

After the movie we went to a swanky Italian restaurant in Century City, but the host refused to seat us. We all had long hair, wore jeans, etc., and had backpacks on. This was in 1975. We looked like hippies, I guess.

The owner came up and asked what the problem was, and the host just pointed at us, like it was obvious we didn't belong there. The owner seemed to feel differently, and seated us himself, at the best table in the restaurant. He made menu suggestions. I had the Veal Puccini, which was delicious.

After the meal, he sent out a huge fruit plate, on the house, and sat with us a while to see what brought us to Century City. We told him about flying down to see the movie, and about our somewhat aborted trip to Disneyland (that's the mushroom story). He seemed fascinated by our adventure and told us to come back any time. He also gave us a nice discount on the dinner. I never made it back, unfortunately.

I did a google search and the place is long gone, but I found a newspaper write-up from 1974, which tells me the name of the restaurant was Puccini's Seafood Grotto, and that they had eight veal dishes on the menu.

I forgot to take any pictures of our dinner or us, so all I have is the shadow of my new cherry tree on my new fence.

tree shadow

Classical doodles

7/22/17 09:11 pm
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[personal profile] radiantfracture
Wednesday after work LB and I hiked in to the lake. We took a more strenuous route than usual, over rough ground, but nothing requiring high endurance -- or so I would have thought. The moment I got home, however, I lay down on the couch and did not rise until night.

The last few days have been like days of recovery from illness -- not soreness or fatigue so much as a sort of muzzy-headedness I dislike much more than pain.

Therefore, I have not done much writing or reading.

I did manage to read Insomniac City, Bill Hayes' memoir of his relationship with Oliver Sacks. It's a lovely, gentle book, a kind of idyll of daily life in New York -- lots of drinking wine on rooftops and talking to strangers in the park. Hayes invokes the sensory detail of their life together with the attention you'd expect of someone who could properly appreciate Oliver Sacks.

I'd read Hayes' description of a piece of music -- Beethoven's Op. 133, say (The Great Big Fugue) -- then cue it up on YouTube and listen -- or look up a meal they ate or an artist Hayes admired. In this way, the book became a delightful multi-sensory experience.

Reading or writing for work and other projects, though, did not seem to be on.

When writing is too difficult, I draw. One of my comfort activities is attempting loose copies of the exquisitely strange radial creatures from Haeckel's Art Forms in Nature. Listening to Beethoven' bright, angular notes, I thought -- why not try to draw this as well?1

Under the cut are a few creatures drawn out of the music, though they are not perfect synaesthetic renderings of these pieces or anything -- more a fusion of what I was looking at, what I was hearing, and what I could actually draw.


Musical Drawings )

{rf}

1. I do see a little colour to music, but it's a very limited palette, shading from blue-white through golden brown to dark brown, and probably has more to do with the colour of the piano whereon I failed to learn to play music as a child, rather than any intricacy of brain connections.
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[personal profile] gurdonark
Friday after work I walked in Breckinridge Park.  The Eastern Bluebirds played among the trees. We dined at Zoe's Kitchen for dinner. We turned in fairly early.

Saturday morning I took Beatrice for a walk. The heat was not bad. But the sun was bright. Beatrice walked from shady spot to shady spot. The walk took 50 minutes. When Beatrice was younger, the walk took thirty minutes.

At mid-day Saturday I went to Home Depot and to Loew's to get some hardware to use to fix my bicycle. I like that nuts and bolts and the like are always very inexpensive, though I miss the huge hardware store pull-out drawers of my youth. The modern system has lots of choice, but perhaps a bit less choice than the old-time hardware store offered.

When I got home, I tried to do the repairs. I was close to having gotten the right thing. But I had not quite gotten it right. I need a washer or two and shorter bolt or so to fix the front tire fender.  I used a wire tie to do a temporary fix on the bicycle. During my ride, the stop-gap stick I put in last week came loose. Its predecessor stick last years. I put in a new stick. It's a curious thing, but I forgot to get a nut and bolt to do the easiest repair--replacing the stick.  I rode for 8 miles, on the Watters Branch trail, the Urban Centre Loop Trail and back home.

I wanted to see the 3:30 p.m. showing of the movie "Valerian".  When I arrived at the Allen cinema, the 3:30 p.m. showing was not posted. I assumed it was sold out, though I did not brave the line to confirm it. Instead, I drove to Suncreek Park. There I could hike the Trail in the Woods, a shady alternative to the Texas heat.  I liked being in the shade by Rowlett Creek. I took pictures of Eastern Bluebirds in the shade.

I went home and read more of the current science fiction I am reading, "Constellation Games". My wife and I headed to Little Sichuan for dinner. Now we are watching a DVD of "Foyle's War". 

friday breakfast: organic frosted flakes
friday lunch: fried chicken breast and leg, french fries and a roll
friday dinner: mediterranean chicken, lentil soup, baked chips and fruit

saturday breakfast: brown rice cereal
saturday lunch: fried chicken breast, french fries and green beans
saturday dinner: shrimp with vegetables, a little rice and hot and sour soup
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[personal profile] zyzyly
After doing my morning stuff I took a drive down to Lodi, which is about 20 minutes south of where I live. It used to be a sleepy farming town on the railroad line, and in many ways it still is. It is also a major wine producing region, and this has brought the town back to life.

Lodi

The old town area has been revitalized, with shops, restaurants, and wine tasting rooms. The town feels vibrant--there are viable businesses, a transit hub with a bunch of little shuttle busses heading out in all directions, and some nice street art. My town could learn a thing or two.

I wandered around for a few hours looking around and playing Ingress. Some of my compatriots built a big farm there, and I was able to get a bunch of gear. After not playing much for the past 6 months, I was pretty much out of stuff to play with. Now I have a lot. Tonight the Resistance came and destroyed that lovely farm. And so it goes.

I had a nice late lunch in a brewery/restaurant. It was satisfying. I walked a little bit more, then came home to work on my doctoral stuff for a while. My final summer report is due on Sunday.

birds

A series of sketches on a wall on a side street. One of my favorite finds today. Birds.

My step-sister and her husband are coming over for dinner tomorrow. They are somewhat reclusive, and we don't see them much, so this is a nice treat. Not sure what I am going to cook, but something that doesn't require too much heat, as it will be 102 here tomorrow.

7/21/17 12:05 pm
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[personal profile] elainegrey
So, i just read about the current state of Mueller's investigation of All The Smoke Around The Trump Campaign to calm myself down.

We have logs from our various web applications at work.
In one data center the logging analysis software has been upgraded.
I now need to log in with my 14 character, must have different case, numbers, and punctuation password, that i cannot repeat for 20-some generations, and that i must change every few months.

And the log in form is http, not https -- that is, all the text is clear and readable on the internal network.

I wrote the person responsible with a request that they switch to https as soon as possible. The response, it's too much work.

I desperately want to sniff his password and use it to log into his email account and forward the email exchange to the head of security.

Instead, my manager is going after the offender.

Steam.
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[personal profile] mallorys_camera
unnamed


Spent another day doing absolutely nothing.

This is probably Not Good since starting this evening, I’m embarking upon ten – count ‘em! – days of intense socialization with (one assumes) limited opportunities for revenue generation or imagination mining.

And yet, and yet, and yet…

Absolutely nothing seems to be what I like to do.

Other people like to drink, take drugs, and party; climb Mt. Everest; sail yachts; watch PornHub; have orgies; eat German sausages; cook Italian food etc etc.

I like to do nothing.

Why not indulge myself?

###

In the afternoon, I did venture out in the oh-so-oppressive heat – 92 degrees, dew point 74 – to do some light shopping at Ocean State Job Lot. Ocean State is a bottom feeder in the liquidator food chain.

The setup of the store physically nauseates me – crude shelves, fluorescent lighting, no attempt at display – and yet I find myself really fascinated with the place: This is where brands go to die. It’s artificially created demand’s graveyard.

This is where Nabisco unloads all those Watermelon Oreos and Banana Split Oreos that nobody in their right mind would ever buy at a supermarket.

Wiffle ball set, anyone? Ocean State’s got like a billion of them.

Discontinued olive oils doctored with chlorophyll? Right this way.

I particularly like the counter of anti-aging skin serums, which since they’re the same ones being sold for $80-plus at various mall anchor client department stores, one must assume are years past their expiration dates so all those carcinogenic chemicals have had a chance to ripen and burst into bloom:

unnamed-1


Sometimes, it's true, you can find rare and wondrous things. Where else outside an ethnic grocery store (where you would certainly be overcharged) would you find six separate flavors of dried seaweed?

But in general, what you are looking at is the retail equivalent of cholesterol plaque.

##

Why the hell is there so much surplus inventory? Be-caw-w-w-se… we have an economy that owes the illusion of its robustness to the production of crud.

This would seem to indicate that inefficiencies exist at some very basic level of the capitalist economic model, no? It’s a particularly interesting question in light of the fact that bricks and mortar retail is under siege right now. Customers much prefer to buy their useless retail items online, which adds yet another layer of inefficiencies (distribution and transportation costs) to the model.

Really, it’s an unsustainable model.

Artificially created demand a/k/a marketing is a great way to persuade people to buy things they don’t want and can’t afford, but as the cost of things that people actually need to survive like housing, energy, and food continues to spiral and the gap between the 1% and the 99% continues to grow, ya gotta think at some point, in the not so distant future, this business model implodes.

I could write all day about this one.

But I’ve got to drag my sorry ass out on the trails before the temps hit 90.

Interrupted Silence

7/20/17 11:55 pm
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[personal profile] gurdonark
I worked another solid day. At lunch I walked in Heritage Park in Sachse. In the evening, I went to the Garland Salvation Army.  The Dallas Volunteer Attorney Program holds a monthly free legal clinic.  Tonight we had a few volunteers and a large number of clients. I did not keep a count on how many clients I met. But I know I met with several.

I read about the resignation of Mississippi football coach Hugo Freeze. Apparently, a school cellphone he used had a call on it to an escort service. I take no joy in his error. But I do wonder when folks will learn about using other folks' devices to conduct such calls.  It appears that an attorney for his predecessor, Houston Nutt, found the call using a Freedom of Information request.  As I understand it, Nutt is pursuing a defamation case against the university, claiming that Mr. Nutt is being blamed for recruiting violations at the school. Sports is its own soap opera.

I like social media. I do not like, though, the way that one loses touch with folks.


July 20--Agatha and Edith

7/20/17 09:30 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
For some reason today I thought about whether I missed being a bedside nurse. I suppose I miss parts of it. I miss spending time with patients and their families, talking to them about what is going on, helping to get them through whatever it is they are getting through.

I miss using my critical care nursing skill set, which I developed over many years of practice. I could rely on my intuition and instincts, and almost always knew what to do. There is a nursing theorist who describes that process, and has written that it takes 10 years to get from novice to expert.

I don't think I could go back into the ICU again. It wouldn't be the same, and I don't think I could handle the relentless 12-hour shifts any more. I do miss it, thought. As I was writing this, I remembered the reason I thought about it. We drove past my old hospital on the way to take a walk in the rose garden and have lunch at a dim sum place in midtown.

wild rose

The rose garden was lovely as always. There were lots of people in the large park surrounding it, but very few people in the garden--mostly volunteers doing some pruning and watering. We wandered around for about a half-hour, sometimes stopping to sit on a bench and take it in.

grandfather plant

This reminded me of my grandfather's back yard. Not the grandfather I write about--the other one who died when I was fairly young--my dad's father. Our birthdays were one day apart, and when he turned 80, I turned 8. I remember him as an old man. His name was Joe.

I like the haziness of the picture. When I think of his back yard, it is hazy and somewhat desaturated in my memory, much like the image above. I could have sharpened it up, but let it be. I prefer my memories somewhat hazy.
mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
Spent yesterday reading Joshua Green’s Devil’s Bargain cover to cover. An obsessively readable book all about the symbiotic relationship between Donald Trump and Steve Bannon.

Bannon was the mutagen who spun the conservative RNA, and Trump was the pointy-headed virus who penetrated the body politic. The disease was the narrative, Crooked Hillary.

The most interesting part of the book for me - since I am what the Trump team dubbed a “double hater” and it’s all about me-e-e-e, right? – was this:

[B]oth campaigns battled for a group of voters who would ultimately decide the race. ... Trump's data analysts gave them a nickname: 'double haters.' These were people who disliked both candidates but traditionally showed up at the polls to vote. They were a sizable bloc: 3 to 5 percent of the 15 million voters across seventeen battleground states that Trump's staff believed were persuadable.

Early on, many indicated support for third‐party candidate Gary Johnson. But after a series of televised flubs, ... they largely abandoned him. ... Many refused to answer pollsters' questions ... These were the voters Clinton had hoped to shear off from Trump with her 'alt-right' speech in August. ... Comey's letter had the effect of convincing the double haters to finally choose.


Double haters ended up going 47% for Trump, 30% for Clinton.

I stuck with the original game plan and voted for Gary Johnson.

As I see it, Comey's letter was not a precipitating event, but a cumulative event that was like the denouncement of a story that Bannon et al had been telling - but more importantly, circulating - about the Clintons for a very long time. The massive Hillary hatred was the result of a very conscious campaign.

Of course, Trump’s story is filled with as many if not more unpalatable facts than the Clintons, but since Trump was not a public servant until very recently, it’s difficult to work up a sense of moral outrage however easy it may be to feel personal disgust.

Also Trump was a celebrity, and the purpose of celebrities is to function as collective ids, no?

One of the most fascinating parts of Devil's Bargain, by the way, is how Trump managed to carry over the narrative from The Apprentice into his campaign. Trump benefited from advertisers' determination to make The Apprentice an ethnically inclusive show so it could sell more McDonald's hamburgers! Black and Hispanic voters LUVVED The Apprentice!
And this is one of the reasons why Trump didn't tank as badly among black and Hispanic voters as Democratic pollsters predicted he would.

Anyway, it’s very clear to me that unless the Left becomes more comfortable creating narratives, they’re cooked.

July 19--Getting ready

7/19/17 10:12 pm
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[personal profile] zyzyly
As I was sitting in the bathroom this morning, thinking, I noticed a very small spider, not much bigger than an ant, had let itself down on a strand of web from the ceiling, and stopped at eye level with me, just a few inches away. We watched each other for a bit. Eventually it started climbing back up toward the ceiling and I went on my way to face the rest of the day. I saw it as a good sign.

I went into work today to put some time in on the curriculum revision I am working on. I finished the revision part, and got a ways into the new content I am adding. This is for the community IV therapy course we have our students complete. I talked to my boss about it a bit, and she told me she was going to get me some funding for the hours I am putting into it. She's great like that.

I spent about 5 hours on the project, then came home and read one of my Hardy Boys books for a while. As things stand in the book, they just got arrested for mail theft and are in jail on a $50,000 bond. I can't imagine they will be able to get out of this, but there are subsequent books, so maybe.

chocko on the table

Chocko basks in the late afternoon light on the breakfast table. Don't tell Malida.

very merry

7/19/17 11:15 pm
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[personal profile] gurdonark
I worked hard but well today. After work. I walked in Glendover Park. I read the sad news that Senator John McCain contracted brain cancer. I read someone's semi-snarky tweet about his condition. I nearly responded with my disapproval, but refrained. I wish people had a little more heart sometimes.  I learned a better new thing this week--an old friend's cancer went into remission. I re-watched the first "Guardians of the Galaxy" movie on television.  I listened to the "Ask Noah" podcast. I read a journal entry from Christmas Eve 2014.  I thought yesterday how much I love Edna St. Vincent Millay's poem "Recuerdo".


breakfast: instant oatmeal
lunch: BBQ chicken breast, green beans and a roll
dinner: baked salmon, roast potatoes, and green beans

7/19/17 03:43 pm
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Woo hoo! Caffeine, antihistamine, and analgesics! I'll have plenty on hand for tomorrow morning.

7/19/17 07:30 am
elainegrey: Inspired by Grypping/gripping beast styles from Nordic cultures (Default)
[personal profile] elainegrey
Odd, how a perfectly reasonable night's sleep can have one more grumpy. I think it's all about antihistamines: in that i had only one left (forgetting to ask Christine when she did a grocery run). Fortunately the loooong commute from the hotel to the office across the highway means i can swing by a grocery and pick up a bottle of pills, plus band aids for where my shoes are rubbing my feet.

The B52's Love Shack is playing as muzak.

I should have brought a few tea bags with me. I thought i could make do with coffee, but i am not a morning coffee drinker. Either that or the drip coffee in the room was vile.

I paid for a month's use of AirDroid pro so i could easily move files to my phone. I have a "Music" folder, and in the "Music" folder i made a "_Keep on Phone_" folder. The music app couldn't find that folder, so i ditched the underscores and created a "000Keep on Phone". That too is not being found. With this last phone i've just had no luck with audio files. It's good that my preference is for audio books.
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[personal profile] elainegrey
On my way to Ohio. 8 pm flights seem to be the way to go. Not only is it direct, but there was no line at security, and the plane is maybe half full. Yippee!!

Sunday I did get the rest I needed. My throat healed up, antihistamines made a difference, and all the other aches ... Well they don't seem as significant.

Yesterday & today I saw deer. I think I can identify two does by markings. One has a crooked ear, the other a white mark - a scar I would guess - on her right hip. Each day I have seen a doe& fawn. It seems plausible that they were the Same pair today & yesterday. Oh Monday a young buck came through as well.

I find it curious that I hadn't seen deer in daylight for a long time. Then they seemed to get active again.

They are nibbling at the garden but today's WRATH is reserved for the squirrel. I've been watching my tomato volunteer #2 set nice large fruit- and today I saw a squirrel near the raised bed . At lunch I went out to find half Eaten green tomatoes scattered under the plant.

FlE.
zyzyly: (Default)
[personal profile] zyzyly
We went to the State Fair today as planned, though without our friend, who was feeling poorly. We did all the things we normally do at the fair.

wave thing

This is one of a couple of rides here that used to belong to Michael Jackson on his Neverland Ranch. Whee.

baby pigs!

See the livestock. Check. Baby pigs!

eggplants

Visit the gardening display. Check.

Visit the vendor pavilions and buy something we don't need, Check. Actually we bought some really cool peelers, and a few more sets of the sheets we bought last year. No Ginzu knives, though.

wine slushie

We tried something new this year. It's a blackberry wine slushie. It was delicious and very refreshing after walking around in the heat all day. While we were there, I ran into one of my former students, who was also enjoying a wine slushie. I almost always run into a former student at the fair.

corn dog

Corn dog. Check. A wise man once said that if you visit the State Fair and don't have a corn dog, it's as if you never went.

foot massager

$.25 vibrating foot massager. Check.

fair picture

Photo booth pictures. Check. This year's and last year's.

It was a fun day.

non-fearsome but feared

7/18/17 09:26 pm
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[personal profile] gurdonark
I like work now. It's a bit busy. After work I walked on the Celebration Trail in Allen. When I walked in the underpass beneath Angel Parkway, a small non-poisonous snake crawled into the shade. I worried that the little snake would be harmed by a panicked hiker, runner or bicyclist. I steeled myself for the worst. People get so carried away about snakes.

When I walked back, I got passed by a dad and daughter on their bicycles (Dad had a son in a pull cart) rode. The daughter, perhaps  5 or 6, said "this will take forever, daddy!". He tried to show her on a map on his phone that they had nearly finished the ride. She looked at the map but was unimpressed.

When I got back to the pedestrian underpass the snake was in good and unobtrusive shape.  But the little girl was afraid. The Dad pointed out out it was only a rat snake. They bicycled by the snake without incident. But the little girl cried once she had ridden past. 

breakfast: brown rice crisp cereal
lunch: turkey sandwich, baked chips, vegetable soup
dinner: turkey sandwiches on sandwich slims with chips

The Po-Mo Smudge-Over

7/18/17 08:50 am
mallorys_camera: (Default)
[personal profile] mallorys_camera
The ice skating scene.

If I wanted to turn this into an exciting, experimental piece of po-mo fiction, I’d write something like, Then they all went ice skating. Gentle reader, do you really give a shit about what their little ice skating party looked like, what its members did, what they wore? ‘Cause I know I don’t. What’s important is what came afterwards.

But alas! This is not a piece of exciting, experimental po-mo fiction. It’s a ghost story in the classic Edith Wharton style.

Although it might be fun to give it a final po-mo sumdge-over once the realistic scaffolding is in place.

We shall see.

###

Else?

Spent a solitary day hanging out with the cats. It’s odd how when I’m in a baaaad mood hanging out with the cats is prima facie evidence of the complete worthlessness of my existence but when I’m feeling la-la-la, it’s entirely enjoyable.

I’m tellin’ ya: It’s all just brain chemistry.

###

Chatted a bit with L about the Former Democratic Candidate’s memorial, the hour-long stream of eulogies: She was the saintliest person evah!

“But Doris was kind of a bitch!” L said, puzzled.

“Well, exactly,” I said. “And that’s why I liked her. She was incredibly generous, but you know, judgmental, and she didn’t suffer fools gladly. But memorials are for the living, I suppose, and that’s how her daughters want to remember her.”

###

Texted with a bunch of people, thereby adding a satisfying The Machine Stops ambiance to my solitude. BB’s entertainingly nutty friend Malika livestreamed a thunderstorm for me: The thunderstorm was doing its best to take out Ulster County but obligingly missed Dutchess.

Got over my crush on the last male human I was kinda, sorta, maybe on alternate Thursdays attracted to: Alpha Male made him a moderator in the Sooper Sekrit Political Group, and he has been pounding me with avalanches of bureaucratic verbiage about governance and leadership traits and fuckin’ Meyer-Briggs profiles.

What is it with these people and their stupid Meyer-Briggs profiles? How is saying smugly, I’m an INTJ! any different, say, than saying, I’m an Aries with Libra rising?

I suppose the truth is that I’m never going to be attracted to another male human ever again. Male humans are fine as friends. But as limerence objects? I dunno. As a class, they show a remarkable lack of appreciation for the subtle.
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[personal profile] zyzyly
I sat out on the back patio this morning and had coffee. I saw a red-throated hummingbird and a green-throated hummingbird, as well as a pair of doves. My attention was briefly directed at a snail crawling across the patio floor. I thought a bit about what the world would be like if snails had feet, and when I looked back, the snail was gone.

After coffee, I went in to work for about 4 hours. I have to revise our IV therapy online module. It will go live on August 10, so the clock is ticking. It used to be revised by a group from the various schools in the area, but they abandoned it last year, and I decided to rescue it rather than write an entirely new curriculum. I figured it would take hours and hours, but I was able to complete two of the four modules today, and will try to complete the other two on Wednesday.

I need to add a module dealing with intraosseous IV access, which is where you use a little drill to place an IV catheter in a bone. It's pretty cool. It will be a short module, though and shouldn't take long.

There were a few people from the program we share space with in the office today, and I got a preview of how loud it is going to be when the semester starts and there are 14-15 people in that space. I'm investing in some good headphones.

I came home and found two packages on the front patio. One was this exercise thing that Malida asked me to buy. It took me two hours to assemble. The other package was a bunch of old Hardy Boys books I ordered.

I mentioned last week that I had bid on a set of books and dropped out when the price got too high. I did another search and found a bunch of the books for sale from another seller for about $3-4 each, so I bought a bunch.

hardy boys

These books were originally written in the 1920s-1930s. The versions I read as kid were revisions that were written in the late 1950s-early 1960s. I have always wanted to read the originals.

I started one today--The Great Airport Mystery. It starts out with a drunken airmail pilot crashing his plane on the highway. Can't wait to see where it goes from there.

We are taking our recently married Thai friend to the State Fair tomorrow. Malida and I love going to the fair, and have our routine down. We start out at the fair food, then go see the livestock, the farm exhibit, and some of the art stuff. When it gets hot, we go see the indoor pavilions. We revisit the fair food and have a corn dog, then go to the pavilion where people try to sell you ginsu knives and such. I love watching those demonstrations. We always end up buying something. Last year it was bedsheets, which we love. We will be looking for them again to get a few more sets.

At the very end of the fair day, we seek out the $.25 foot massagers, then have our picture taken in the photo booth. It is supposed to only be 92 degrees tomorrow, so should be a good day.

Malida's cousin, the one who lives in Frankfurt, is on holiday and posting lovely pictures of waterfalls and things like that on Facebook. Malida made a comment on one picture in Thai language, and I hit the "translate" function to see what she said. "Put it on the hook, Hank", said the translator, completely mangling something like "that looks like a nice place to swim."